Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Alex

Over the summer, on Goofy's birthday, actually, Alex broke his pinky finger. It was awful. I am not describing what happened, but I can tell you he tripped over his own feet and it's something I will never be able to scrub from my brain. This poor baby, if anything bad happens, it's usually to this one. We walked right straight through the house to the van and went to the emergency room in our pajamas. That means me in my tweety bird shorts and him in his t-shirt and diaper. Good thing I keep some of his clothes in my car.


After going through hell with x-rays, he was so mad when they put the temporary cast on his arm.


But he was fine once we got home.


We had a little bit of trouble finding an orthopedic surgeon who accepts Medicaid, but found them in Cardinal Glennon's offices at St. Anthony's. Goofy requested a green cast and he was mad when Alex came home with the color Dad picked out.



It was a pretty bad break that required surgery and possible pins. He did great... the medication made him loopy.






and the hospital staff were nice enough to send him home to wake up. That made a big difference.

























And, Goofy got his green cast.

Alex slept clear through to the next day, nice and comfortable in his own bed.



Many hilarious moments came from this, like when Alex could no longer have baths (not hilarious for me or Alex, considering he's a bath tub junkie) and I was working too far from home to come back and change Alex's diaper, Walter had to shower him for the first time ever. I was at the Walgreen's drive thru when I got the phone call. I had Walter on the phone, trying to talk to the cashier and walk Walter through a shower- step by step, as if the boy hasn't been washing his own ass for going on 10 years- Walter is panicking, not wanting to wash Alex's downstairs area. I told him to get rubber gloves and where to find them, and I'm describing in detail how to put soap on a rag and all of that, when Alex's step-mom takes pity on me and takes the phone. She's reassuring him that he's doing a great job while I pick up prescriptions, when I hear freaking out followed by "it's ok, calm down. No, you are not doing anything wrong, just pretend he's a baby. Babies laugh like that." I got my phone back, and tried to hold my laughter back as I finished talking him through while we moved on to our next stop. I got a much needed laugh and Walter got an extra $20 that day.

Later in the summer, I was concerned about one of Alex's toes. His feet have an odd shape and I was worried that it was messing up one of his toes. I took him to the pediatrician, who said that his toe was fine, but he was concerned about the range of motion in his ankles. He wanted him evaluated for AFOs.

There has been an ongoing thing with AFOs. He had them when he was 5, they were giving him blisters or something and the AFO lady said the issue was cosmetic and he didn't need them anymore. so, ok, problem solved. Then when he started at his special school, the physical therapist was not happy about that and insisted he needed AFOs. She did an evaluation and said he was fine. Now the pediatrician wants AFOs and I'm all *shrugs* whatever. Send me a referral, we'll go be evaluated. Then I get a call to set up the appointment. I am instructed to bring a $150.00 deposit. I laughed and refused. She said Medicaid does not cover AFOs, so it's going to be a $150.00 deposit. If I had a $150.00 deposit, he wouldn't be on Medicaid. No, thank you. I emailed the pediatrician, who told me to ask Alex's broken pinky team what they thought.

That appointment was yesterday. At the start of the appointment, I was asked what my recent concerns are for him to need the AFOs. I have no concerns, I thought it was cosmetic. After a couple of exams and several trips up and down the hall barefoot, Alex's range of motion is fine, his toe is a little concerning- we're going to have to watch it. He needs properly fitting shoes and good socks because of a callus on the top of his toe, and the shape of his feet might be a problem. The shape of his feet make AFOs a bad idea. The way his feet curve, he would try to adjust for the AFOs, which would make his ankles turn out and cause him to have even more difficulty walking. The shape of his foot alone would cause problems with his ability to walk, so she thinks they should keep an eye on it. Funny how a change in wording changes your view on "concerns." She asked if I had any concerns with his ability to walk. Well, I don't know, he was running through the yard, tripped over his feet and broke his finger- that might be a little concerning. We now have yearly appointments for his feet, and his finger is fine.